Global Corruption Barometer 2013
New Zealand

3% of Kiwi's Report Paying a Bribe in Global Survey

9 July, 2013 - Transparency International today released the 2013 Global Corruption Barometer, and its key finding from the global survey of 114,000 respondents in 107 countries: bribery is widespread with 27 per cent of those surveyed globally reporting they have paid a bribe in the last 12 months when interacting with public institutions and services.

The New Zealand component of the survey involved 1000 New Zealanders and was undertaken by Colmar Brunton in January and February this year and found:

  • 3% of New Zealanders surveyed reported paying a bribe
  • Of those who reported paying a bribe their reasons for doing so were because:
    • It was the only way to obtain a service (35%)
    • To get a cheaper service (29%)
    • To speed things up (21%)
    • As a gift/gratitude (15%)
  • 65% of those surveyed thought the level of corruption in New Zealand has increased over the past two years

Transparency International New Zealand Chair Suzanne Snively says she is not surprised by the research but acknowledges many will be.

"There is a mistaken impression that New Zealand is somehow removed from bribery practices which are common place in the rest of the world. In fact, as we seek to strengthen our business and trade opportunities with countries that are commonly ranking poorly on anti-corruption indices, our exposure to illegal activity such as bribery is increasing.

Having a public sector that operates with high integrity provides an opportunity for the lower cost of doing business, access to quality markets, more satisfied customers, better shareholder return and the attraction and retention of employees who want to work for ethical organisations. The objective of the assessment is to keep New Zealand as good as it is perceived", she said.

"Internationally we are 'perceived as a country of little corruption. We currently rank at the top of the annual Corruptions Perception Index which rates perception not experience. This reputation presents significant competitive advantages and economic benefits for New Zealand business. But we need to ensure that perception is reality", she said.

"There is no place for complacency for any of us whether we are at work, in school, or at board, management or government level in New Zealand. We must be vigilant about these matters and ensure we manage our risks actively and resoundingly", she said.

Other New Zealand findings include:

  • 44% responded that the New Zealand government's actions are ineffective in the fight against corruption.
  • 88% of New Zealanders surveyed reported willingness to sign a petition asking the government to do more to fight corruption.

All New Zealander's are encouraged to join TINZ; a strong national chapter is a very effective mechanism for systematically fighting bribery and corruption in New Zealand.

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