Anti-corruption day - 9 December 2016

Friday 9 December marks International Anti-Corruption Day. This was established after the passage of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption in October 2003 and came into being because of the UN’s concerns over the huge dangers corruption poses to societies in all countries.

"Evidence shows that good systems are the best antidote for corruption and keep us ready to deal with corrupt practice when it is detected here." Says Suzanne Snively, Chair of Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ).

Looking forward from Anti-Corruption Day, New Zealand needs to ensure all public-sector agencies’ and private sector integrity systems are world class with high levels of transparency, integrity and accountability.

In 2017 the issue of taxation needs to be addressed further. New Zealand businesses need to commit to transparency and accountability by pro-actively disclosing their beneficial ownership. And we need to enhance oversight of professional services through finalising Phase 2 of the anti-money laundering reforms.

As Prime Minister John Key noted in March this year, "We expect a New Zealand company to pay its fair share of tax, we expect a New Zealand citizen to pay their fair share of tax, should we expect a multinational to play by different rules?"

At the Transparency International Annual Members' Meeting in Panama (29 November to 1 December) a policy was adopted on the overlap between corruption and tax abuse identifying aspects of both issues that need to be tackled, including regulatory capture and undue influence in the lobbying processes around tax policy.

Identified solutions to tax abuse and corruption focus on corporate and government transparency, such as beneficial ownership transparency, transparent lobbying and enhanced oversight of the engaged professional services.

Illicit financial flows have been estimated to exceed an annual US$1 trillion. The release of the Panama Papers offered more evidence than ever before about the extent to which the corrupt rely on a web of anonymous companies, trusts and other vehicles to transfer, launder and hide their illicitly sourced funds in locations also characterised by secrecy.

Actions

Recent Activity

Protect our whistleblowers
Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) is calls for better whistleblower protection. 8 Aug, 2017

Auditor General resignation requires transparency
Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) calls on Parliament to release the report by Sir Maarten Wevers that lead to the resignation of Auditor-General Martin Matthews. 5 Aug, 2017

TINZ applauds decline in foreign trusts
Government implementation of tougher disclosure requirements for foreign trusts have led to around 75% discontinuing or exiting New Zealand. 9 Jul, 2017

Public Sector Integrity Media Release
State Services Commission took a very positive step in addressing a key recommendation of TINZ's Integrity Plus 2013 New Zealand National Integrity System Assessment by advertising a role for Deputy Commissioner, Integrity, Ethics and Standards. 11 May, 2017

Corruption Perceptions Index 2016 TINZ media release
Transparency International 25 Jan, 2017