Political Party Integrity Articles

Ethical Leadership in a Changing World – Massive Open Online Course starts again on 30 September

14 September 2020

The second edition of Ethical Leadership in a Changing World, a massive open online course (MOOC) goes live on 30 September 2020.  This is offered by online course provider edX and developed by Victoria University of Wellington (VUW)’s Brian Picot Chair of Ethical Leadership, Karin Lasthuizen.

 

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Parliamentary Code of Conduct

14 September 2020

The new proposed Parliamentary Code of Conduct addresses important issues of inappropriate sexual conduct and bullying. The code is part of proposals to make Parliament a safer working environment, from one where unacceptable conduct had become “normalised”.

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Citizen power – building our knowledge base

14 September 2020

Democracy faces daily new risks in the digital age. This article highlights a few tools like ‘The complete guide to NZ Election 2020’ which aim to create an informed electorate and provide transparency around political advertising and political content.

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Transparency questionnaire for 2020 General Election: Commentary on political party responses

14 September 2020

Anne Gilbert

TINZ remains concerned that political parties are largely unaware of New Zealand’s vulnerability to the impact of corruption that originates overseas.

They are generally naive about how our international reputation for strong integrity attracts the corrupt on one hand, while on the positive side, strengthening New Zealand’s integrity systems to prevent this corruption has the potential to accrue value to their constituencies and to our economy. 

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Election 2020 questionnaire responses

10 September 2020

Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) posed seven key questions to each political party on issues of transparency, anti-corruption and protection for whistleblowers. Here are their responses

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Candidates’ Panel: Business and political integrity during COVID-19 recovery

10 August 2020

Join Transparency International New Zealand, the Victoria University Brian Picot Chair of Ethical Leadership and 2020 Election Candidates from across Wellington on Tuesday 6 October (rescheduled from 25 August), as they share their insights and perspectives on business and political integrity during our recovery from the COVID-19 crisis.

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Transparency International and others remonstrate over G20 Summit’s civil society process in Saudi Arabia

20 February 2020

At a time when the world is facing a wide range of challenges, independent voices are needed more than ever. A country that closes civic space until it is virtually non-existent, cannot be trusted to guarantee the basic conditions for international civil society to exchange ideas and collaborate freely on any issue, let alone those issues it deems sensitive or offensive.

Such is the host of this year’s ‘Civil 20’ meetings affiliated to the G20 Summit.

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Transparency in coming general election

17 February 2020

A review of recent Transparency International New Zealand (TINZ) activity around elections offers a broad-brush look at our initial plans for the 2020 electoral cycle.

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Money in Politics

23 January 2020

This year, Transparency International analysed the relationship between politics, money and corruption, including the impact of campaign finance regulations and how money influences political power and elections.

Keeping big money out of politics is essential to ensure political decision-making serves the public interest and curbs opportunities for corrupt deals. Transparency International’s research highlights the relationship between politics, money and corruption. Unregulated flows of big money in politics also make public policy vulnerable to undue influence.

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Transparency of Political Party Funding Essential

14 December 2019

Transparency of political party funding is essential to provide clarity about who is influencing decision making.

The lack of transparency is putting New Zealand’s reputation for strong integrity at serious risk. It erodes trust in our elected representatives, degrades our financial well-being, and impacts on our society and how it works together.

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